Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Six Sentence Stories - Single

For quite a few years I wrote in a journal fairly regularly. While I still do write about some things just in my journal, there are times when a blog hop prompt launches a memory that just needs to be shared here in this space. 

This time I am linking my blog hop post to Six Sentence Stories - Single, hosted by Denise at Girlie on the Edge Blog. I enjoy reading the stories written in six sentences written by the other bloggers who link up each week, whether the stories be historical fiction, mysteries, confessions of sorts, or clever adaptations of some of their other writings. It is definitely worth clicking the link to see where the wordsmiths' creative talents have taken them each week. Sometimes you might find yourself wanting to read some of their other blog posts, ones that go beyond the six sentence structure. That in itself can be an adventure for the reader.




Riding in the farm pickup with the wooden slats on the sides, often used for hauling their feeder pigs to the auction, wasn't her favorite place to be, especially when they were downtown in the capital city where farm vehicles were not as commonly seen.

Even with the windows rolled down, the hot August air seemed humid and still except for the puffs of foul smelling emissions coming from the muffler of the souped-up old car in front of them every time the duck-tailed driver revved his engine.

As they waited for the light at the intersection to turn green, her dad turned toward her and asked if she wanted him to drop her off to see the famous singer who was signing autographs at the record store that day.

He looked a little disappointed when his shy 11-year old daughter shook her head sideways after glancing at the mob of excited teenagers gathered by the entrance waiting to get inside.

In 1954 some families had started to get television sets, but her family didn't have one yet, nor a record player, and the bedside radio was in her parents' bedroom, so she had no knowledge of the partially deaf local boy who had risen to stardom with his single 45-rpm.

The next day her dad showed her an article in the paper which said there had been 500 people that had waited to get Johnnie Ray's autograph, but she showed no emotion and she didn't shed a tear.




18 comments:

  1. Oh, opportunity missed. One of the saddest things for a kid. Good six. This is one of your best.

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    1. Thanks.

      Sometimes it takes a few years to recognize the missed opportunities, even that of having an autograph of a famous person.

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  2. So many times we can say, if i had only known. But we didn't know, and she didn't know, and only time shows what we missed. Excellent six!

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    1. Thank you. Time and experience brings knowledge.

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  3. You paint pictures with words and fill them with emotion. This memoir is beautifully written. I think I was probably about 11 (it was the 60's) when I bought my first single 45. I think it was The Gypsy Cried by Lou Christie. Remember those plastic little do-dads that went in the center of the 45s to put them on the spindle of the record player. Thanks for the memories, Pat.

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    1. Glad you enjoyed reading my SSS.

      I just listened to "The Gypsy Cried." I remember the voice. Yes, those "plastic little do-dad" made it possible to even play the record.

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  4. A wonderful window into the life of a girl growing up in the early 50's, my generation too! I've never been one to collect autographs or be attracted by fame, but I think it would have been nice to look back after his passing and remember that you once met him. My sister, as a young teen, shook Robert Kennedy's hand at a campaign rally one time; she didn't wash her hand for a few days, and she remembers that brief encounter still, taking place very shortly before his death.

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    1. Wow! What a wonderful encounter your sister had. That would be something to remember.

      Speaking of autographs, do you remember having an autograph book, one that you had your friends an relatives sign, or was that before your time? I had one in grade school, but it wasn't something that I kept.

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  5. I'm with Val and Josie on this one... where's the popcorn?*

    I could almost hear the rusty squeaks and see the white T-shirts with rolled up short sleeves. Very cool Six

    *compliment to the 'put you in the theatre as a movie places' but more engaging

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    1. There could probably be a whole other story about that guy in the car cruising the gut, and still wearing the white T-shirt with short rolled up sleeves.

      I'll have to provide popcorn next time. LOL

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  6. great story, Pat! You managed to get across a real piece of nostalgia. Zoe

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    1. Thanks, Zoe. I'm glad you enjoyed it.

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  7. I enjoy your intros as much as your 6 sentence stories Pat. And, like you, I love reading everyone's 6's as I never cease to be amazed at how much creativity can fit in a mere 6 sentences.
    This is a lovely story, lovingly told. You've got an amazing knack for descriptive writing. Felt like I was there :)

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    1. Thanks, Denise. I have always enjoyed pieces that help me feel what it might have been like to be in that time and place, so I thank you for the compliment that you felt like you were there.

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  8. Cool way to educate me on some musical history. I confess to not being familiar with Johnnie Ray. I also enjoyed the truck in the city, i.e., duck out of water feeling for the character.

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    1. For sure, the "duck out of water feeling of the character."

      Johnnie Ray had an interesting history.

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  9. The heartbreak of a missed opportunity - but as has been said already, sometimes we just don't know. Love the care with which you've presented the details of the city, the truck, etc. Just lovely!

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    1. Thanks, Lisa. I tried to put myself back in that place.

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