Thursday, February 1, 2018

Six Sentence Stories - Dress

History woven in and out of stories is something that captivates me, and even in my writing sometimes can't help but emerge. My post here is going to be linked up to Zoe's Six Sentence Stories - Dress blog hop. It can be a challenge to write a story in just six stories, but it is one I enjoy. Others who are sharing today over at Zoe's will really appreciate any visitors to their sites too. It won't take long to read these stories and you can be assured that the stories will be quite varied. So click the link to find other bloggers.




As she tried to avoid stepping on the toys on the living room carpet where the kids had been playing, some of the pile of Workbasket Magazines she was carrying in her arms tumbled to the floor. "Ouch," she said as she stepped on a block when she stooped down to pick up the publications and add them to the pile on the sofa. Clipping some of the patterns and recycling the remainder of the issues was one of her goals before the big moving day, even though some of the magazines had been given to her by the older generation and held some historical significance to her.

That was then, but this is now, years later and awaiting the birth of a granddaughter and looking through her clippings for a pattern to follow so she could make a blessing outfit. She found a pattern and pulled out the needed needles, hooks and baby yarn and worked on the top portion of the dress until she needed to see what the next step was on the other side of the slightly yellowed paper only to discover the remainder wasn't there and was missing among her clippings! 

"Maybe I should have kept all those magazines instead of trying to cut out the articles," she thought, "but perhaps I can look through the other patterns and find something that will do for the skirt portion of the dress." 

A partly knitted and partly crocheted white blessing dress with narrow satin ribbons woven between the bodice and the skirt and also around the short sleeve edges. The bottom of the skirt edge is scalloped and gives the appearance of a stream of wide wavy "W's." While the bodice is smooth and flat in appearance, the skirt   has the look of vertical streamers. 


10 comments:

  1. What a precious story. That has happened to me with recipes. I cut out the picture and the ingredients and I'm missing the procedure. The dress, by the way, is lovely. I crochet but do not (can not) knit and when I'm sewing or crocheting I am always channeling our fore-mothers. I think about all the material in all the magazines that ends up in a heap of recycling. So much to read, so much to do, so little time.

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    1. Thanks, Val.
      I used to buy and subscribe to a lot of magazines with recipes and patterns, but now it is so easy to go to the internet. However, I still have a lot of saved clippings and some magazines. You are so right, there is so much to read and do, and so little time.

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  2. excellent Six! (in that way of tearing a small, discreet hole in time/reality allowing us to observe. so much more effective than 'writing a story', it's kinda of telling a story with a quiet enough voice to allow the Readers to go and see what you see.)
    cool

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    1. I like weaving a morsel of the past into stories, because it is easier to recall (some of the time - HaHa) those details than even to begin to imagine the future. So many of the comic strips of the past had considered things far beyond my imagination, and now the future world is way beyond my comprehension much of the time.

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  3. Good story. Lots of magazines (sewing and cooking,) recipes, pictures, etc. at our house too.

    The one who dies with the most fabric wins you know.

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    1. The fabric is another matter. HaHa

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  4. True story? I've done it with recipes. Similar story was my great aunt, who was a telephone operator in a very small town. She was listening in on a conversation where the women were exchanging a cake recipe, but as she was hurriedly writing it down, she missed an important ingredient. Of course, she couldn't ask either of the women for it, because then they would know she had been listening in!

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    1. True story.
      Oh, that is so funny about your aunt listening in as a telephone operator. I didn't know that they did that, but I should have known, since on the old party lines, people on the line could listen in, and did.

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